Rietveld Schroder House

I was asked to pick a UNESCO World Heritage Site and do a complete rebrand for it. After much research, I decided to go with the Rietveld Schroder House in the Netherlands. This site really stood out to me as being radically different from other UNESCO sites because most of the sites listed were either natural landmarks or older architectural sites that were much larger in scale with strong religious or

cultural ties. 

Process

The biggest challenge in this project for me was definitely designing the logo. I wanted the logo to be clean, simple, and structured just like the qualities reflected in the UNESCO site itself. Here are some of the early logo sketches I worked on before settling on the final.

Final Project

The final logo design was loosely based on a simplified facade of the house and it incorporates all the accent colors seen throughout the house. These colors also became the brand's color palette. The fifth element is a grid pattern inspired by the rectangular pattern of a De Stijl artwork.

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Keep scrolling to see a breakdown of the individual deliverables or view the full project overview document here.

The lines of the logo on the letterhead, info sheet, and envelope each extend in different directions based on the the way I wanted to draw the eye or frame the information. 

The yellow line of the logo is extends beyond the front of the business card and onto the back as a way to connect the information.

The actual current homepage of the Rietveld Schroder House website features a full size image of the house. I wanted to keep that idea but alter it a bit to fit better with the rest of the brand identity I created. 

Since The New Yorker offers three different types of ad styles - the full page, the two side-by-side half pages, and the three third-page ads in sequence - I wanted to incorporate one of each into my series of three ads. I used my color palette to create duotone images of artifacts related to the house and experimented with the scale of my grid element to organize the information within each of the ads.

This information booklet is compartmentalized in three sections in order to mimic the structure and compartmentalization of the house itself. The left and right sides of the booklet are bound shut using a straight stitch and the flaps of the book open from the center. All the text on the left side of the booklet contains general information about UNESCO World Heritage sites while the text in the two right flaps focuses solely on the Schroder House.

This is a mockup of a 3-dimensional site sign to be placed outside the Rietveld Schroder House. The sign is in the shape of the logo to make the landmark of the house easily identifiable to anyone familiar with the branding and it is meant to feature eight different languages so it is easy for tourists from all over to read about the site.